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How to Stick with CRM Past Your Initial Data Import

Increasing user adoption is difficult for nearly every company that installs Customer Relationship Management (CRM) software. It’s a powerful tool but one that your staff needs to get used to. A lot of articles will tell you to incentivize team members or lead by example, but the tips listed below are four concrete, practical ways you can use ensure your team sticks with–and benefits from–CRM longterm.

 

Train, train, and train again! | Don’t make the mistake of only having one training session to get your team ready for CRM. Even if they understand how to use the software quickly, a refresher may be necessary. Give them the tools they need to succeed by providing extra training sessions, video tutorials, handouts, and manuals they can reference to solve problems on their own.

Get rid of the excess. | No one is happy when they have to enter useless information into CRM. It makes the software seem tedious, and no one likes searching through it later. Instead, take the time to get rid of any unnecessary fields in your CRM. It will declutter the page, streamline the process of entering information, and ultimately make CRM easier to use.

Check your phone. | Is your CRM mobile friendly? If not, it probably should be. Being able to access all of your precious data on the go is essential to empowering your staff to be productive from anywhere. This is especially true for your Sales Team.

Tap into your contacts. | In this day and age, nearly everyone has business contacts that they mainly connect with over email. All of those interactions–and the relevant information passing between recipients–may need to be logged into CRM. Make it easy by adding CRM to your email.

 

Don’t wait and hope that your team members will adopt CRM over time. Be proactive! Contact us to learn more about increasing user adoption.

CRM is an incredibly powerful solution for many organizations. It has been around for decades and during that time it has grown and branched out to support many different areas of business like field service and social listening. Once the decision has been made to integrate a CRM solution into your business, what’s the next step? How do you get started?

At DPT, the answer is simple. We walk every client through a thorough process to determine their unique needs and goals and assess what resources they can devote to this project.

Define Your Success in Business Terms | Choosing to implement CRM is a big decision for many companies. There can be a lot of pressure to justify the cost and labor involved, especially for project leaders. To mitigate this, DPT meets with key stakeholders and listen to what they want CRM to accomplish in business terms, not software functionality. We also note their concerns, pain points, and any issues that may need to be addressed down the road.

Get the Lay of the Land | Whether it’s analytics, marketing automation, or tracking different touch-points with clients–every business has a unique set of needs that they want CRM to address. Key stakeholder interviews give us a clearer picture of what our clients want and this step helps us determine how we can provide it for them. We analyze time constraints, cost, skills, people, and other available resources.

Plan For Change | Switching to a new CRM is a process and there are always staff members who resist the change. It’s important to have a realistic plan in place so your team can know how to better manage the transition. We’ll help you find the right balance between the “carrot and the stick” for your organization.

Deal with Your Dirty Data | Your organization has a lot of data and the fact is not all of it is clean. During this phase, DPT determines what it will take to integrate or transfer your data to useful information in CRM. This includes evaluating data quality, building a security plan to ensure your information stays secure, and determining how long the migration will take.

Draw a Roadmap | It’s common for companies to have a laundry list of things they’d like to use CRM for, but it’s impossible to attempt everything all at once. Instead, DPT will work with your team to identify which items are the most urgent and which can wait until later. Then, we’ll build a step-by-step plan to introduce these changes gradually. This will help ensure that users become comfortable with and accustomed to the new system at a reasonable pace.

Take the Next Step | After all of the evaluating and planning listed above, DPT will put together recommendations on what to tackle first. Think of this as a summary of the steps above. Your team will be presented with the roadmap, cost, and timeline for the highest value functionality. If your organization chooses to move forward with the project, then you’re well on your way to implementing CRM!

Begin your journey towards CRM implementation today! Contact us to set up a no strings attached consultation. You can also follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter to keep up with all things CRM.

What’s your workstyle? Organized or free-form? Big-picture or detail-oriented? No matter which you identify with, chances are your colleagues would choose differently. Diversity can benefit your business, but your business development team’s different styles may not always mesh well. If each person has a different timeline and process for getting the same set of tasks done, it can lead to a lot of confusion and miscommunication.

Your sales team might waste time chasing a long-shot lead when there’s a hotter one on the table, because priorities haven’t been clearly indicated. Marketing may be targeting the wrong audiences because they can’t distinguish which leads are qualified. Project managers may find themselves running around and putting out fires because no one is following the same process.

Can you imagine throwing technology into the mix? No matter how good the software is, it can’t solve these types of problems on its own. So what can?

A standardized business process and change management approach.

Imagine what it would look like in your company. Communication would be clear between departments. There would be clearly defined stages in the sales pipeline so everyone could see exactly what had been done and what still needed attention.

How do you make that a reality for your business?

Opening up communication between departments is the first step. Determining what your process needs to achieve and how success–and failure–can be defined will give your business a framework to start improving. It’s also important to step back and assess how your team drives business end-to-end and weave that into your process design.

How does your business generate demand for its services? How does Sales and Marketing nurture and manage leads? How do they manage the sales pipeline? All of these questions are essential to developing a process that incorporates all relevant departments and serves your business’ goals.

For example, your business may be struggling with bringing in qualified leads for your Sales team. It’s obvious that the end goal is converting leads into sales, but that’s never going to work smoothly if your Sales and Marketing teams don’t define success the same way.

Marketing may think they’re successful because they’re bringing in several leads a week. In contrast, Sales may look at those leads and say marketing didn’t bring them anything worth pursuing. Ensuring Marketing and Sales can agree upon a definition for success is the key.

If Marketing can better direct their efforts, then they’ll generate an increased number of qualified leads. More qualified leads drive sales and increases conversion rates. It also increases efficiency because your team is only concerned with vetted leads.

Accommodating your team’s different work styles while creating a standardized process for your business is an absolutely necessity if you want to grow your top line revenue. If you want to see how streamlining your process can increase the number of quality leads, contact us today.

You can also follow us on LinkedIn or Twitter so the next installment of this blog series, What Does That Do Again? Implementing Technology to Support Business Processes, will come straight to your feed.

As discussed in our previous posts, all your sales and operational data does not provide the same level of value to your organization. So then why do you think you should manage all data to the same level of quality? Quality is relative to the value the information provides or supports as measured by its contribution to your business objectives.

The goal is not perfection – because there is a cost to perfection that will not necessarily lead to increased value. A better goal might be… “imperfect – but with intentional and consistent quality”.

Here are some tips to help you develop and manage a balanced data quality program.

“Value Stream” Your Data

The concept here is that if you can’t map (clearly identify the affect of) how the data contributes to a meaningful and measureable outcome for your organization or department, then it is simply an interesting piece of information and not worthy of process control. Note that this does not necessarily mean that the data should not be maintained at all – but it does beg the question.

Begin by outlining the key measurements that drive your organizational or departmental success. These are the outcomes (think KPIs) that must be met in each of your organizational performance areas such as compliance, financial, operations, customer service or reputation management.

Next, go down a level and identify the measurable outcomes that drive success in each of your key measurements for each organizational performance area. For instance, one such measurement in the financial domain may be total sales revenue generated in a period.

Then map the data that contributes to each of those measurements. Be specific and identify the data element’s contribution level by categorizing it as:

  • Direct – has a direct relationship to the final measurement. For instance, the actual GL revenue generated from a sales transaction. This then ties back to a key measurement of profitability.
  • Supporting – is not directly attributed to the measurement, but supports the narrative for the measurement.  For instance, the level of discount applied to the list price to arrive at the net revenue amount.
  • Leading – a direct measurement to the future of the primary area of focus.  For instance, the estimated net GL revenue on open sales opportunities.

Balance is Key

Once you map each of the organizational performance areas, you should validate them based on the tiers you outlined based on our previous Blog post. Then you can more easily identify each of the organizational performance areas. This helps you understand WHY data is important and is valuable in supporting process and data quality communications with your team. This also informs how you must balance your organizational performance areas and therefore your data management and quality programs.

Lastly be sure to look at the data that you maintain that IS NOT on the list created through this analysis. Ask yourself why you maintain it. If you can’t identify how the data provides current or future value, is it worth having? In a world that leads you to believe that more data is always good – it can be argued that without intention and purpose it is just cost and not value.

Design Quality Goals Based on Value

Now you have the information to define data quality goals that are meaningful to your organization. Using data source and business process analysis techniques, you can build processes that increase the value of the right data while not spending time and money on information that does not lead to results that are important to you. You now can build an intentional and consistent quality management program for your data. This is the subject of our next post – in the meantime, click here to read the rest of this blog series.

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