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Sunday, 19 June 2016 00:00

Marketing Automation Strategies & CRM

Written by  Diane Birtles
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Marketing Automation

Your sales team has mastered the pipeline and opportunity management portion of your new CRM solution and sales have been on a steady increase for an extended period of time. Until recently. Sales have flat-lined with a very real fear they may actually start to show a downward trend. Worse yet, the marketing and sales teams are at odds with one another as to how to solve the problem. Apparently, in an attempt to keep up with the Sales team, Marketing has been flooding the sales pipeline with, shall we say, less than high quality leads. Marketing is frustrated that the Sales team is ignoring hot leads while the Sales team has all but given up trying to figure out which leads are worth following up on!

What happened?

Let’s take a moment to review the events that may have led to the above scenario.

A number of organizations implement a CRM solution due to the growing pains that often follow increased sales and the subsequent demands it puts on the sales and support teams. At some point in time, without streamlining and scaling the sales process, the stress and strain of the sales volume can bring a team to its knees. An effective CRM solution can bring standardization, automation and increased visibility to the sales process which in turn can relieve many of the pain points and permit the sales team to focus their energies once again on closing sales.

The result? A new pain point; the Sales team needs more qualified leads, and the Marketing team needs a more effective way to nurture and qualify leads for the Sales team. If only there was a “CRM” for Marketing.

Enter Automated Marketing!

What’s the next step to improving the management of your sales prospects and increasing your lead conversion ratio? Streamlining and standardizing your marketing processes should be your next step to increasing not only the number of leads in your sales pipeline, but the efficiency of nurturing and the quality of those leads as well.


Automated marketing techniques have been around since the ‘80’s. The simple task of automatically inserting a name on an envelope or letter was one of the first, of many, mundane tasks a marketing automation tool performed. Today’s automated marketing tools do so much more than personalize communications. Wouldn’t you like to know that your emails are being opened? Or who is visiting your website, how often they visit, what they look at and how often?


Per our DPT mantra, before you focus on the tools you need to develop your Marketing Automation processes and strategy before defining which tool is the best part of your overall CRM strategy. Whatever Marketing Automation tool you use, your processes and strategies need to be integrated into your CRM strategy to enable your Sales and Marketing teams to work more effectively together. 

Common functions include:

  • Outbound email communications
    • Create newsletters and email responses with ease and in coordination with campaigns and utilizing your CRM marketing lists
  • Web Analytics
    • Know who is visiting your website and which content they’re downloading or viewing
  • Web form management
    • Easy-to-Build web forms “Contact Us” and customer surveys
  • Lead nurturing campaign with automated scoring  
    • Communicate with and score a lead based on a prospect’s activities (email opens, website visits, content browsed…etc.)

Much in the same way that your CRM has improved the effectiveness of your Sales team, Marketing Automation strategies and processes can help your Marketing team focus their efforts on nurturing a warm lead into a hot lead that any Sales team would love to follow-up on and close!

Having both the sales pipeline and Marketing Automation portions of your CRM actively working together will align your Sales and Marketing teams towards a common goal. At DPT, we can help you take the next step in enhancing your CRM solution by incorporating Marketing Automation processes and functions. Contact us to learn more.

 

Read 920 times Last modified on Sunday, 19 June 2016 15:13